Welcoming in the News | Welcoming America

Welcoming in the News

Here are some media coverage highlights to inspire and inform your own community’s welcoming movement.

News Archive

Why Houston is becoming more accepting of immigration

The continued growth in positive attitudes toward immigrants is thanks largely to a younger generation of Houstonians that is more diverse and more comfortable with diversity than older generations. For example, 37 percent of the baby boom generation and 35 percent of Gen Xers felt immigration into the country mostly threatens American culture, but only 13 percent of millennials agreed.

Hamtramck, MI: An evolving city of immigrants

Pick a street corner in downtown Hamtramck, Mich., and you'll be struck by the incredible mix of cultures crammed into this tiny, 2-square-mile city. What has united all of the immigrant groups who've come to Hamtramck? Good jobs in the auto industry. Hamtramck is surrounded by Detroit, and for decades, car manufacturing was its lifeblood.

Trump may not want immigrants, but Rust Belt mayors do

In the suburbs and countryside of Rust Belt swing states, President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant message may have carried the day, but in the region’s post-industrial cities, it’s anathema. Mayors from Detroit to Cleveland -- as well as northeastern cities like Albany, NY, and Lowell, MA -- see financial salvation in immigrants and are dismayed by Trump’s drive to tighten the borders.

An undocumented high school senior who left Mexico aged 4 has been accepted to Harvard

Victor Reyes arrived in the US when he was four. Today he is class valedictorian, a soon-to-be computer science major at Harvard, and DACA student. "I want to be the one to show them that being undocumented isn’t a disadvantage. Instead, it is a motivator. Being undocumented helps you discover the virtue of hard work and perseverance."

Why embracing immigrants brings growth to Rust Belt cities

The Muslim ban goes against everything our country stands for, and it's an example of how when we abandon our values, there are real economic and social consequences for U.S. communities. But Rust Belt cities, like our members Dayton, Detroit, and Buffalo, understand the benefits of building a welcoming community for all.

There is a place for all of us here; cities affirm welcoming despite executive orders

As more communities wake up to the impact of national policies that stoke fear and recognize that such policies are not in their self-interest, we hope they move beyond symbolic welcoming affirmations to do the important work of creating truly inclusive places where all residents can participate and contribute more fully.

How moms and families can create welcoming communities for immigrant families

As moms we know that the best way to build strong families is to have strong communities. Our strength is grounded in our ability to work together. From those who cook the food that we eat to those who invent businesses, new immigrants realize the value of working hard and doing our part.

Colorado Representative proposes task force to highlight immigrant contributions in the U.S.

Congressman Jared Polis created the Saved by American Immigrants National Taskforce to counteract Trump’s VOICE program. The project will share stories of immigrants — documented and undocumented — who have positively contributed to U.S. society.

How immigrants helped save the economy of Akron, Ohio

The new arrivals have kept Akron's working population young as the city's aging baby boomers retire. Many of them are working in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs or they are opening businesses -- and creating jobs.

Michigan and Detroit need immigrants to reach goals

Immigrants start companies that employ Detroit and Michigan residents. They fill unmet talent needs in high-tech, manufacturing, agriculture and service industries, allowing companies to compete, create jobs and raise incomes for their workers. They enhance our culture and quality of life and are critical to building a 21st-Century Michigan with a prosperous middle class. 

Police reassure local Muslims, create opportunity

"We are one Lynnwood," Chief Davis told them, saying that the department would continue, "to be a vigilant, proactive police department that will hold accountable those who wish to do harm to any members of our community." Police and community trust have never been more important, and small gestures and signs of solidarity can go a long way in building that trust.

How refugee neighbors changed a man’s mind about Muslims

John Dutcher hated Muslims. But then he met his refugee neighbors and actually took the time to listen to their stories and get to know them. An amazing thing happened: “They took the hatred out of me,” he says, tears welling up in his eyes.

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