Welcoming in the News | Welcoming America

Welcoming in the News

Here are some media coverage highlights to inspire and inform your own community’s welcoming movement.

News Archive

How ‘they’ become ‘we’

The president of the Migration Policy Institute discusses how the federal government has played an important role in immigrant integration over the past century as well as how we can continue to successfully include newcomers in our communities.

Small towns welcome refugees with open arms

Cities like Clarkston, GA; Rutland, VT; and Fargo, ND, see an opportunity not only to help during history's worst refugee crisis but also to revitalize their cities by welcoming refugees. Refugees have been offsetting population loss in many small towns as well as opening new businesses and filling jobs.

Our welcoming city

“[The initiative] formally recognizes Houston and makes clear to everyone that indeed Houston wants to continue being one of the most diverse and welcoming cities. We want immigrants to know that if they are here and contribute to the society, we are here to welcome them."

Study: Immigrants add to regional workforce

A new study by New American Economy highlights the economic contributions of immigrants in Ohio. If the state were to keep only half of its 2,400 advanced degree graduates, 3,100 jobs for US-born workers would be created in the next 5 years. 

New Hampshire's capital joins welcoming movement

The City of Concord is another place that has joined Welcoming America’s network and will begin building a more inclusive and prosperous community by welcoming newcomers. In 2014, immigrants in New Hampshire earned $3.4 billion and contributed over $700 million to state, local, and federal taxes.

Houston moves to become 'Welcoming City' for immigrants

The City of Houston has declared itself a Welcoming City and joined Welcoming America’s network of over 100 nonprofits and local governments. Houston is the most diverse, rapidly growing metro area in the country with immigrants injecting over $116 billion into their GDP.

Boston proposes an ID to make it easier to include all

Boston joins a growing cohort of cities, such as Detroit (link to our blog?) and Cincinnati, who are implementing municipal ID programs to reduce barriers to services and participation for the elderly, homeless, immigrants, and other groups.

Camp Illuminate teaches English, nature to immigrant, refugee kids in Nashville

A promising practice out of Nashville combines nature and English lessons to empower young English Language Learners and continue their education beyond the school year.

Why ‘immigration is good for business’

At the Democratic National Convention, New York, Philadelphia, and Phoenix mayors and Welcoming America’s Executive Director discuss why immigration and being a welcoming city is important for their communities’ future and how they benefit economically, civically, and culturally from a welcoming climate.

From refugee chefs, a taste of home

A Paris restaurants wants to expose native French people to the cuisines and cultures of those who were arriving on their shores. They wanted to create jobs. And perhaps most of all, they wanted to begin to change the way immigrants are viewed in France.

America once excelled at immigrant integration. Here’s the way back.

The President and CEO of the National Council of La Raza covers how business, government, and nonprofit sectors can work together to make integration a less onerous.

Berlin dinner parties that celebrate refugees and their food

The Berlin initiative Über den Tellerrand combats prejudice by integrating migrants into the local communities of 20 German cities through cooking classes, recipe sharing, pop-up restaurants, and more. This project helps change perceptions and build bridges between long-time residents and newcomers.

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